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The Lucy Fagella Pottery Blog is where I share the how the pottery is made. Pottery process is a beautiful thing… watching a pot rise up from a lump of clay at the wheel, or seeing a work table filled with freshly thrown pieces. This blog focuses on process shots, pottery videos, the work table at the end of the day, and some finished work fresh from the kiln.

mugs waiting for the firing LucyFagella

 


 

Asparagus Valley Pottery Trail 2017

The 13th Annual Asparagus Valley Pottery Trail 2017 is one week away!

To find out all the details, visit our website.

Take a look at this 1 minute video I created to give you a little idea of what you are in store for this year!

 

Aside from the great pottery you will see and be able to purchase from the 22 potters, there will be demos, food, and raffles… even live music at some studios. You can also drink our new “Pottery Trail Ale” made by Lefty’s Brewery! You can also attend our After Party BBQ at Snow Farm Craft Center and drink Pottery Trail Ale there!

Below is a little sample of what’s new at my studio for the Trail! If you can’t make the Trail this year you can visit my shop page.

batter bowls lucyFagella.com

Teacup Lucy Fagella

Biodegradable Urns, Encaustic Painted

Biodegradable Urns are made with paper pulp and recycled clay. The surface of these urns are painted with encaustic wax and pigment.

I am categorizing these urns as biodegradable, because like my 100% biodegradable urns they are not fired in a kiln. The paper and clay part of these urns will break down in water, and in the earth. The encaustic painted surface application of beeswax and damar resin (tree sap) are not totally water soluble, therefore these urns should not be used for burial at sea. My intention for these urns is for natural earth burial, or to keep as a treasured memory for your home.

I have been making biodegradable urns since 2009. I mostly work with patterns and hand painted papers to create quilt like patterns on the surface, see earlier post here.  On these latest urns I am using the encaustic painting technique, which is an ancient method of painting with beeswax and earth pigments for color. See history here.  I have always been intrigued by this method of painting because of the layers and textures that can be created from the hot wax. It feels so much like working in clay. I am able to manipulate the hot, warm, and cool wax with tools… it is such a sculptural way of painting.

A couple of years back I took a workshop at R&F Paints in Kingston N.Y.  I spent a few days there learning the technique of encaustic painting. I brought a few of my tiny biodegradable urns with me hoping I could paint on them once I learned the proper method on wood and paper first. The workshop instructor was happy I brought the urns, and said that people use encaustic on clay tiles, so it would work just fine. As I began to melt the wax on the surface of the clay many ideas came to mind for the endless possibilities! I had so much fun taking a break from pottery for a few days and learning something new. I also learned that just because I am a potter/artist it does not mean I can just pick up a new medium and expect it to be easy. I gained a new respect for encaustic painters in those few days at R&F Paints.

Fast forward two years later. I have finally made time to use what I learned from the workshop. These new urns are the beginning of a new way of working with clay, paper, beeswax, and pigment. I am liking the texture and the earthiness that I am achieving.

The first photo below shows the urn freshly made. It needs to dry completely before I begin the process on applying the hot wax and pigment. The following photos show the finished pieces.

These small urns will hold up to 20 cubic inches, and measure 5″h x 4″w. They can be found on my shop page here.

Making the biodegradable paper clay urn LucyFagella.com

 

Encaustic Painted Biodegradable Urn LucyFagella

Biodegradable Urns Encaustic Painted LucyFagella

biodegradable urn, bottom detail

biodegradable urn lid detail Lucy Fagella.com

Slow Made Pottery

I choose to make slow made pottery… that is one at a time, by my hands only.

Here is a little video with some Sunday music, (slowed down a bit more than usual, for effect).

This short little video shows me trimming a plate on a foam bat. The plate is pushed into the foam with my fingers. I use a large lid from a jar to evenly distribute the pressure of my fingers, so as not to dent the bottom of the pot. Plates create lots of ribbon like trimmings!

These particular plates that I am trimming are for a custom order of plates and chalices. I will be making ten plates (aka Paten) and ten chalices for a church in Southern California.

 

To purchase Chalices and Plates visit my shop here.

Chalice and Paten LucyFagella.com

 

Instructional Video on Making Spoons and Scoops

 

ceramic scoops LucyFagella.com

 

I am excited to share my first full length Instructional Video on Making Spoons and Scoops! People always ask me how do I make my ceramic spoons, so I thought this would make a great instructional video.

This is a detailed, start to finish pottery lesson on making ceramic spoons and scoops on the potters wheel. In this video I will demonstrate methods of throwing, cutting, altering and joining to create finished spoons and scoops. I will also talk about decorating and firing. Your end product will be useful, functional and decorative spoons and scoops that you will feel confident to sell, or to just give away as gifts. You can watch a promo video, and purchase the full length video at teachable.com.

I have been a potter for over 30 years, and ceramic instructor for nearly 30 years, and have a wealth of knowledge to share with beginner to advanced pottery students. I tend to give a lot of that knowledge away for free on Instagram, Facebook and Youtube… but I want to get into more detail with my videos… little snippets are good, but just not enough for those wanting to really learn more about this difficult craft. Students want more too, and have asked me for longer videos, so I thought why not give it a go!

I love the whole video process, from filming to editing, but have found that it takes a whole lot of time to make even a short video. The editing takes enormous amounts of time… probably 80% longer than the actual filming. It’s another whole job on-top of being a full time potter! Since it takes lots of time to create something of value, these lessons will be sold through teachable.com. When you purchase a video there is no time limit as to how long it is available… it is yours to keep forever through teachable! You don’t have to worry about downloads taking up all the space on your computer, or fussing with dropbox to get access to the video!

There are different names for gaining knowledge online… courses, classes, lessons, lectures, membership sites, and subscription service… (I may be missing a couple). I have chosen to name these videos, ‘Online Pottery Lessons” because it is one lesson at a time.

This first Online Pottery Lesson – “Making Ceramic Spoons on the Potters Wheel” is geared for intermediate to advanced students, but not to worry beginners, more to come in the future for you on basics. I would love it if you contacted me and let me know what you would like to see in a video!

I know that many people want to learn the craft of pottery, but do not have access to pottery classes. This is part of the reason I am creating these videos. Think of these as taking a class with me at my studio! These videos are like a one on one pottery lesson. One of my fondest memories as a teenager was getting ten private pottery lessons from a local potter. It was my high school graduation present from my parents. I learned so much from those one on one lessons! So in memory of first pottery teacher, I thought “Pottery Lessons” would be a fitting name. You can visit my lessons here.

 

Blue and White, Faceted, Footed Urns

The blue and white faceted, footed urns are out of the kiln! (See earlier post, New Urns for 2017 here.)  The blue came out as I had hoped it would… the glaze breaking a crisp white like I had imagined. As a potter you need to have some faith that things are going to work out when you give it over to the kiln firing. There is quite a gap from making the piece to the finished outcome weeks later. Nothing is immediate in pottery. We make our work, then let it dry a couple of weeks before it can go in the kiln for the bisque and glaze firings. Even when we know our glazes well, things can change when put on a new form. It is a happy event when you open up a warm kiln and see a piece just as you hoped it would turn out!

faceted footed urns, blue keepsake LucyFagella.com

The white faceted, footed urns also came out as I had hoped. I will be adding both of these new urns to my line of cremation urns for 2017. These urns will be available soon on my shop page here.

faceted, footed urns, white keepsake LucyFagella.com