Biodegradable Urns, Encaustic Painted

Biodegradable Urns are made with paper pulp and recycled clay. The surface of these urns are painted with encaustic wax and pigment.

I am categorizing these urns as biodegradable, because like my 100% biodegradable urns they are not fired in a kiln. The paper and clay part of these urns will break down in water, and in the earth. The encaustic painted surface application of beeswax and damar resin (tree sap) are not totally water soluble, therefore these urns should not be used for burial at sea. My intention for these urns is for natural earth burial, or to keep as a treasured memory for your home.

I have been making biodegradable urns since 2009. I mostly work with patterns and hand painted papers to create quilt like patterns on the surface, see earlier post here.  On these latest urns I am using the encaustic painting technique, which is an ancient method of painting with beeswax and earth pigments for color. See history here.  I have always been intrigued by this method of painting because of the layers and textures that can be created from the hot wax. It feels so much like working in clay. I am able to manipulate the hot, warm, and cool wax with tools… it is such a sculptural way of painting.

A couple of years back I took a workshop at R&F Paints in Kingston N.Y.  I spent a few days there learning the technique of encaustic painting. I brought a few of my tiny biodegradable urns with me hoping I could paint on them once I learned the proper method on wood and paper first. The workshop instructor was happy I brought the urns, and said that people use encaustic on clay tiles, so it would work just fine. As I began to melt the wax on the surface of the clay many ideas came to mind for the endless possibilities! I had so much fun taking a break from pottery for a few days and learning something new. I also learned that just because I am a potter/artist it does not mean I can just pick up a new medium and expect it to be easy. I gained a new respect for encaustic painters in those few days at R&F Paints.

Fast forward two years later. I have finally made time to use what I learned from the workshop. These new urns are the beginning of a new way of working with clay, paper, beeswax, and pigment. I am liking the texture and the earthiness that I am achieving.

The first photo below shows the urn freshly made. It needs to dry completely before I begin the process on applying the hot wax and pigment. The following photos show the finished pieces.

These small urns will hold up to 20 cubic inches, and measure 5″h x 4″w. They can be found on my shop page here.

Making the biodegradable paper clay urn LucyFagella.com

 

Encaustic Painted Biodegradable Urn LucyFagella

Biodegradable Urns Encaustic Painted LucyFagella

biodegradable urn, bottom detail

biodegradable urn lid detail Lucy Fagella.com

Spring at Lucia Pottery

The dogs, Daisy and Willow are guarding the studio as usual, while I am making my pots. My focus right now in the studio is stocking up on urns.  I have made my very smallest keepsakes to my largest urns, and have very tired hands to prove it. Now I’m giving it a rest and taking photos for my etsy FoodieCeramics shop, and my etsy LuciaUrns shop.  This coming week I will be in the fields and woods picking leaves and flowers for my yearly springtime making of biodegradable urns. And lastly, I having been watching a lot of baseball.  Only one son is playing this year as the other is off to college and not playing for now.  The Greenfield HS varsity team did very well again this year, not as good as last year (winning the Western MA championship).  They lost yesterday in the Western MA final.  Today the summer American Legion league started, so not even a day break for a baseball mom!

Lazy Memorial Day weekendReady to carveAll Sizes of UrnsFields of Grass Urn dryingGreen leaves urns drying

 

Summertime Studio, Biodegradable Urns

I have been focusing on the biodegradable urns as I have the last two summers.  The grasses, leaves and wildflowers are readily available… although I seem to be using less than I have in the past.  I’m leaning more towards the patterns as I have always done in my porcelain pottery.  I love patterns and optical illusions… these feel like they are coming together to give the quilt like feeling I love so much.

Here are some photos of the pieces at different stages of drying in the studio.  Once they are completely dry I will photograph them for my etsy shop, LuciaUrns

Breaking From My Daily Ritual

It is not a regular ritual, like the day in, day out making of my functional pottery.  Making my biodegradable urns is something that happens every couple of months (unless I have a special order).  Making these urns is a whole different mindset from my functional foodie pottery.  The first thing I have to do is clear the big work table… which in turn clears my head.  I lay out the colored papers which I painted months before.  I think about my forms and patterns, roll out the paper clay that I have made weeks before, and begin creating.  The thing I love about these urns is the process… a totally different process than what I do daily in my studio.  The results are immediate, the color, the texture, and the form.  No kiln involved, no waiting a couple of weeks for the results!

Permanence/Impermanence

Impermanence in ceramics… an oxymoron, as potters we strive for permanence.  Pottery is fired to 2300 degrees.  Pottery marks time, it is what we find in archaeological excavations, telling us about cultures from long ago. 

As a potter I hope that my pots will bring a lifetime of enjoyment and use for the people who own them, and some memory of the maker.  ‘Functional’, ‘useful’ and ‘beautiful’ are words I like to hear when it comes to my pottery.  The question I have asked myself the past few years is this:  can I leave my mark, making beautiful, useful, functional pots without them being permanent?  In my biodegradable urns I feel I have achieved this. I am making a piece of art that is only meant to last for a short time, but this short time is of utmost importance… the transition from life to death.  Rituals surrounding death have always included art, masks, body paint, pottery, objects, song and dance, which are meant to transition the person to the afterlife, and help sooth the grieving.  In making these urns I am following these ancient traditions.  I hope that what I create in the urns is a balm for the living, which helps to sooth the grief.